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Archive for the ‘Cell Phones for Kids’ Category

Freedom of Choice

A couple of years ago, we did a wacky (I mean creative) YouTube video called “Page Plus Gives You the Freedom to Control Your Cell Phone Bill.” It was based (loosely) on the movie Braveheart – the actor was running around in blue and white face paint yelling “Freedom!”

The video got a whopping 1,600 views – hardly viral. But despite the lackluster performance of the video, the concept of “freedom” still applies to no-contract (prepaid) wireless service from Page Plus. In fact, with new wireless customers choosing no-contract service over contract service by a ratio of 10 to 1 (Entner), it’s more relevant than ever. Here are four reasons why:

1. No Contract: Of course, not having a two-year contract is the most obvious example of freedom. People are realizing in droves that they not only can have the freedom of not being stuck in a two-year contract, but that no-contract service is actually cheaper than postpaid! The last statistic I saw was that over 25% of U.S. wireless customers are now on no-contract service, and that percentage is growing by 23% a year. Of course that still pales to other countries (in Western Europe, for example, 70% of wireless customers are on prepaid), but the point is that the trend is growing rapidly here in the U.S.

2. Switching Plans: The ability to quickly and easily switch plans is another “freedom” you have with Page Plus. Since your service is month-to-month, if you find that your plan isn’t big enough for your usage this month, you can simply change to a higher plan next month. And even better, you can even customize your service plan if your usage happens to fall between two plans. All you have to do is carry an extra cash balance on your account to be used for “overages.” For example, if you run out of data a couple of days short of your renewal date, but you still have voice minutes and texts left, you can continue to use more data at the overage rate of your plan and just pay for it out of your cash balance.

3. Control Your Budget: One of the primary benefits of no-contract service is that you have the freedom to control your budget. Because the service is prepaid, it eliminates the possibility of “bill shock” – the surprise postpaid customers can get when they (or someone in their family) rack up a huge, unexpected bill. With prepaid, there is no bill. You use what you pay for. Of course there are a couple of ways to continue your service if you run out of something (minutes, texts or data) – you can add cash for overages, as described above, or simply renew your monthly plan early. No matter whose cell phone you’re paying for – your own, or your teenager’s or college student’s – YOU control your budget.

4. Phone Selection: Some companies only let you use their phones on their service. They don’t have BYOD (Bring Your Own Device). Or they’ll limit you to only use feature phones (not smartphones) on certain plans, or require you to pay for a data plan with certain smartphones. With Page Plus, you can use any of our phones on any of our plans. You can use any of the phones available directly from us or from our dealers, plus all the 3G CDMA phones that we’ve approved in the past. That’s freedom of choice!

So get out your blue and white face paint everybody, and celebrate YOUR freedom!

There’s Still a Need for Pay-As-You-Go Cell Phone Service

While many cell phone users today are on some type of monthly service plan that includes allotments of voice minutes, texts and data, there is still a fairly large segment for whom a “pay-as-you-go” plan is still the most economical way to go. These are the people who have a glovebox phone for emergencies, or have multiple devices for different uses, or whose minimal usage simply does not justify a large monthly plan of talk/text/data that they will never use. These “low-usage” people come from all walks of life, from children to the elderly.

Long before Page Plus Cellular offered monthly talk/text/data bundle plans, pay-as-you-go cell phone service was the only service it offered. While the demand for it has certainly diminished over time with the explosion of text messaging and data usage, there is still a sizeable niche for the pay-as-you-go crowd. It is still a very affordable option for those whose limited cell phone usage makes it the most economical way for them to go. For example, an $80 Standard (pay-as-you-go) plan from Page Plus provides 2,000 talk minutes and lasts for a full year. That’s just $.04 a minute. Or, at the very minimal usage, a $10 Standard plan provides 100 minutes and lasts 120 days.

While there are other service providers out there who also offer pay-as-you-go service, Page Plus remains one of the most competitive. For example, you may have seen TV commercials from Consumer Cellular that show a group of retirees sitting around a camp fire talking about how their monthly cell phone bill can be as low as $10-$15. But in a direct comparison, their pay-as-you-go service is not nearly as cheap as Page Plus Cellular’s. Since the Page Plus plan lasts for 120 days (only 30 days for Consumer Cellular), here’s a direct comparison for 80 minutes of talk time over a 4-month period:

Consumer Cellular

Page Plus Cellular

Monthly Service Fee

$10.00

$0.50

Per Minute Rate

$0.25

$0.10 (or less)

Total Cost for 80 Minutes Used Over 4 Months

$60.00

$10.00

 

As you can see, Page Plus is clearly the more affordable way to go, saving you $50 over a 4-month period compared to Consumer Cellular. And this is based on Page Plus’ highest per-minute rate of $0.10 – consider that if the $80 plan is used, the per-minute rate is just $0.04/minute, and the savings are even greater! So, if you fit into the low-usage group, you should consider no-contract, pay-as-you-go cell phone service from Page Plus Cellular for more affordable rates. To learn more, visit the Page Plus website at www.PagePlusCellular.com.

Cell Phones and Kids – When Is The Right Time?

September 26th, 2012 1 comment

Considering a cell phone for your child and thinking about what age is the right age? The real question is not if, but when.

 

A YouthBeat survey from the first six months of 2012 found that 13% of children ages 6 to 10 already own one and that 12   is the most common age for that first device. 18% of kids get theirs at that age. Middle school is the clear-cut time according to Gwenn O’Keeffe, a pediatrician who last year co-wrote an American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) report on children and social media. She reported, “There’s a huge developmental leap between fourth and eighth grades.” Of course many experts will still say that it still depends on many factors. Here are factors most often to consider when making that crucial decision:

Here are some factors for parents to consider offered by PBS Parents Magazine:

How independent are your kids?

—Do your children “need” to be in touch for safety reasons — or social ones?

—How responsible are they?

—Can they be trusted not to text during class, disturb others with their conversations, and to use the text, photo, and video functions responsibly (and not to embarrass or harass others)?
—Can they get behind the concept of limits for minutes talked and number of texts or do they need an inexpensive, unlimited text and talk plan like Page Plus offers?Other points to consider:

—Do they lose things easily or forget them?

—Do they understand that the device is not a toy and not something that can be replaced at will, over and over without a great expense?

—Are they aware of the potentials of invasion of privacy or security and identification breaches?

—Can they take care of technology?

When will your child be ready? At the end of the day it still depends on your child’s level of maturity, responsibility and need and guess what? Once the cell phone conversation ends, the ‘when to get a car’ question is right around the corner.

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